Fair Trade Bracelet Handmade in Jordan

Your purchase of fair trade jewelry and hand crafted products can help people in communities and areas of the world where agricultural products may not be viable.  While the certification process for these products is different than for commodity goods, they represent an important option to help break the cycle poverty and dependency.  Here are some of the reasons to buy fair trade jewelry:
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Children making rugsOf course you aren’t hiring children, at least not on purpose.  But are you sure?  The reality is that unless you’re buying fair trade clothing, you can’t be confident that your clothes have not been made by a child or in a sweatshop.  While there are few fair trade options available for consumers today, this may change soon. [click to continue…]

Tea Pickers in Terraced FieldThere are many steps from the farmer to the tea in your cup, with little of the retail price being distributed to those who actually plant and pick the leaves.  For tea lovers to continue to enjoy high quality tea in their cups, the fairness of the tea supply chain matters. [click to continue…]

The quality of food sold in developed countries and the livelihoods of millions of people in developing countries are becoming more reliant on small-scale farming.  The fair trade movement has grown as a powerful force to support small farmers and their communities.  Some argue that for fair trade to be adopted by mainstream consumers, large scale farms and plantations are needed to produce higher quantities of products.  These articles provide some insight into the impact of small farms on food security and developing communities.
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One of the reasons that fair trade make sense is that it rewards ethical decision making and sustainable business practices. The result benefits everyone from producer to end consumer. Here are some recent news articles that describe the business benefits of doing the right thing.
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Fair Trade Products Delivered To Your HomeThe Fair Trade Connect Store is setup to make it convenient for you to find fair trade products and have them delivered to your door. The collection includes a wide variety of products from suppliers who have certified by independent organizations such as Fair Trade USA or the Fair Trade Federation.

While you can certainly go to Amazon and search for fair trade products, the problem is that you’ll get a list of products with “fair trade” in the product name but no verification of certification status.  In some cases, the product may show a fair trade label but the supplier’s certification may have lapsed.  What this means is that there is no independent verification that the farmers and producers of the products are actually receiving fair wages for their labor or their share of the fair trade premium.  Each supplier of products in the Fair Trade Connect Store has been cross-checked with the certifying organization to ensure that their certification status is current. [click to continue…]

Farmers hand pick coffee beans when ripeOver 2 billion cups of coffee are consumed each day, with coffee being the second most valuable commodity traded in the world (after oil). Millions of people rely on the production, roasting, and sale of coffee to make a living. Brazil, Columbia, Mexico, Indonesia, and Vietnam are the world’s largest exporters of coffee. For some of the least developed countries, coffee accounts for up to 80% of export income. [click to continue…]

First Fair Trade University - Univ of WisconsinAcross the United States, a growing number of colleges and universities are committing to the purchase and promotion of fair trade products and principals.  These institutions are part of a movement called Fair Trade Universities and Colleges.  The initiative began in 2008 at the University of Wisconsin and in May, 2013 became part of an umbrella group called Fair Trade Campaigns.

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“There is certainly no doubt about it – Fairtrade has saved the Islands. Without it we would be in desperate trouble.” – Cornelius Lynch, Secretary of the Fairtrade Committee, St Lucia

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The first Fairtrade Fortnight was held in 1997 in Scotland and has since become an international campaign to create awareness of the plight of small farmers in the developing world and how the consumption habits of richer countries can help or hurt them.  Consumers and retailers participate as a way to promote fair trade with activities range from food tastings and fashion shows to media events and petitions for change in public policy.
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